Three years after being told he only had 18 months to live, a patient in the UK is now cancer-free after participating in a clinical trial for a new drug. While testing is still in the early stages, this drug could prove to be a valuable weapon in the global fight against cancer.

Patrick Caughill

A Man Given 18 Months to Live Is Now Cancer-Free, Thanks to a New Drug

 Three years after first being diagnosed with lung cancer, Bob Berry from Manchester, UK, is now cancer-free, all thanks to his participation in a clinical trial for a mysterious new drug. The drug does not have a name, but it is reportedly used in combination with immunotherapy to help the body fight off the cancer itself.

The trial took place at The Cristie, a cancer research center that’s part of the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) and one of only six centers worldwide participating in the trial. Berry was one of the very first people to be treated with the drug a mere 12 months ago.

Prior to beginning the trial, his diagnosis was not a good one. “Three years ago, I was given 12–18 months to live, but I have already surpassed that and I feel well,” said Berry. “At the end of the day, this clinical trial has extended my life, and I couldn’t be more grateful. Anyone who is offered a clinical trial should seriously consider it.”

THE FUTURE OF CANCER TREATMENT

According to Dr. Matthew Crebs at The Christie, “Bob has had a phenomenal response to taking part in this clinical trial. His most recent scans show that he’s had a complete response with no apparent trace of tumor in his body. We will need to monitor Bob closely with regular scans to assess how durable this response will be.”

This amazing drug could be the future of caring for cancer patients. However, it is still in its earliest trials and much more testing will be needed before the drug is available for widespread use.

The doctor was also sure to mention that cancer is a very complex disease and not all patients are guaranteed to respond as remarkably as Mr. Berry. Still, this is an exciting development in the search for a cure for cancer.

Ovo je naslov koji bi trebao ići u najmanje dva reda ali nikako

Three years after being told he only had 18 months to live, a patient in the UK is now cancer-free after participating in a clinical trial for a new drug. While testing is still in the early stages, this drug could prove to be a valuable weapon in the global fight against cancer.

Patrick Caughill

Three years after first being diagnosed with lung cancer, Bob Berry from Manchester, UK, is now cancer-free, all thanks to his participation in a clinical trial for a mysterious new drug. The drug does not have a name, but it is reportedly used in combination with immunotherapy to help the body fight off the cancer itself.

The trial took place at The Cristie, a cancer research center that’s part of the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) and one of only six centers worldwide participating in the trial. Berry was one of the very first people to be treated with the drug a mere 12 months ago.

Prior to beginning the trial, his diagnosis was not a good one. “Three years ago, I was given 12–18 months to live, but I have already surpassed that and I feel well,” said Berry. “At the end of the day, this clinical trial has extended my life, and I couldn’t be more grateful. Anyone who is offered a clinical trial should seriously consider it.”

Image credit: Tim Vernon—Science Photo Libra via Getty Images

THE FUTURE OF CANCER TREATMENT

According to Dr. Matthew Crebs at The Christie, “Bob has had a phenomenal response to taking part in this clinical trial. His most recent scans show that he’s had a complete response with no apparent trace of tumor in his body. We will need to monitor Bob closely with regular scans to assess how durable this response will be.”

This amazing drug could be the future of caring for cancer patients. However, it is still in its earliest trials and much more testing will be needed before the drug is available for widespread use.

The doctor was also sure to mention that cancer is a very complex disease and not all patients are guaranteed to respond as remarkably as Mr. Berry. Still, this is an exciting development in the search for a cure for cancer.

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